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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

8 edition of Coca, cocaine, and the Bolivian reality found in the catalog.

Coca, cocaine, and the Bolivian reality

  • 19 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by State University of New York Press in Albany .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Bolivia.
    • Subjects:
    • Coca industry -- Bolivia,
    • Cocaine industry -- Bolivia,
    • Drug traffic -- Bolivia

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 271-298) and index.

      Statementedited by Madeline Barbara Léons and Harry Sanabria.
      ContributionsLéons, Madeline Barbara., Sanabria, Harry.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD9019.C632 B6418 1997
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 310 p. :
      Number of Pages310
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1005563M
      ISBN 100791434818, 0791434826
      LC Control Number96045353

      The inclusion of coca leaf in Schedule I was done with a dual purpose: to phase out coca chewing and to prevent the manufacture of cocaine. The Single Convention mandated to destroy coca bush if illegally cultivated (Article 26) and that coca leaf chewing must be abolished within a year period (Article 49) - i.e. by December , 25 years. At last month’s meeting of the United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs in Vienna, Bolivian President Evo Morales made headlines by dramatically brandishing a coca leaf he had apparently smuggled into the Austrian city between the pages of a book. The coca leaf, which is the unrefined source of cocaine and is considered an illegal.

      Coca is a sacred plant to the people of Bolivia and Peru, as well as a traditional medicine and a source of the US government, it is evil, to be eradicated at any cost. Contrary to popular belief, the burst of energy it gives comes not from the cocaine content - this is in fact destroyed by saliva in the digestive tract, which is why cocaine users must snort or inject - but from.   Coca is also the raw ingredient of cocaine, the powerful narcotic that is the primary target of the US-led "war on drugs". Bolivia tried to wipe out the leaf at Washington's behest.

        The United Nations released a report on coca cultivation in Bolivia today showing it has decreased for the first time since But estimates of cocaine production raise questions. It focuses on Bolivia and Peru. Phillips, Joel L. and Ronald W. Wynne. Cocaine: The Mystique and the Reality. New York: Avon Books, This book discusses the history of Coca use along with myths and legends surrounding the plant. It also explains the source, production and chemical composition.


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Coca, cocaine, and the Bolivian reality Download PDF EPUB FB2

Coca, Cocaine and the Bolivian Reality Paperback – Octo by Madeline Barbara Leons (Editor), Harry Sanabria (Series Editor) See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Format: Paperback. 1. Coca and Cocaine in Bolivia: Reality and Policy Illusion Madeline Barbara Léons and Harry Sanabria 2.

The Coca Field as a Total Social Fact Alison L. Spedding 3. Coca, Cash, and Cloth in Highland Bolivia: The Chapare and Transformations in a Pages: Coca and cocaine in Bolivia: reality and policy illusion / Madeline Barbara Léons and Harry Sanabria --Coca field as a total social fact / Alison L.

Spedding --Coca, cash, and cloth in Highland Bolivia: the Chapare transformations in a "traditional" Andean textile economy / Elayne Zorn --Coca debate and Yungas landowners during the first. Book: Coca, cocaine, and the Bolivian reality pp pp. Abstract: The impact of coca and the cocaine trade on Bolivia bolivia Subject Category: Geographic Entities see more details is examined.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: 1 online resource (xii, pages): illustrations, maps: Contents: Coca and cocaine in Bolivia: reality and policy illusion / Madeline Barbara Léons and Harry Sanabria --Coca field as a total social fact / Alison L.

Spedding --Coca, cash, and cloth in Highland Bolivia: the Chapare transformations in a "traditional" Andean. Coca and Cocaine in Bolivia: Reality and Policy Illusion Madeline Barbara Léons and Harry Sanabria 2.

The Coca Field as a Total Social Fact Alison L. Spedding 3. Coca, Cash, and Cloth in Highland Bolivia: The Chapare and Transformations in a "Traditional" Andean Textile Economy Elayne Zorn 4.

COCA, COCAINE, AND THE BOLIVIAN REALITY State University of New York Press. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Paperback. pages. Dimensions: in. x in. x es the impact of coca and the cocaine trade on the Latin American country most affected by it, Bolivia.

This volume examines the impact of coca and the cocaine trade on. Coca is a leaf that is integrated in the Bolivian culture through rituals, medicine, food, religion, social interactions, and much more.

The primary use for the coca leaf is consumption; it is chewed or brewed for tea. Coca leaves are not exclusive to Bolivia, rather many Andean countries such as Colombia, Chile, Argentina, Ecuador, Peru, Paraguay, and Brazil use coca for.

Coca is any of the four cultivated plants in the family Erythroxylaceae, native to western South America. The plant is grown as a cash crop in Argentine Northwest, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, even in areas where its cultivation is unlawful.

There are some reports that the plant is being cultivated in the south of Mexico as an alternative to smuggling its recreational product cocaine. Coca has been cultivated in medium-altitude parts of the Bolivian Andes since at least the Inca era, primarily in the Yungas north and east of La ation expanded substantially in the s into the Chapare region of Cochabamba and some production flowed into the international cocaine market.

The US-backed efforts to criminalize and eradicate coca (outside the Yungas) as part of the. Route 36 in La Paz, Bolivia, is the world's first and only cocaine bar, serving grams of coke alongside cocktails and beers.

One woman reports on what it's really like to go there. The cocaine alkaloid content can go much higher, as was shown in one sample of coca leaf from the Chapare region in Bolivia that measured percent.

Coca grown on the upper slopes of the Andes also contain more cocaine alkaloids than coca grown in low-lying areas.

It is therefore believed that the best quality coca is grown at higher altitudes. Cuarto Intermedio, 1, also Leons, B. & Sanabria, H. (eds.) () Coca, Cocaine and the Bolivian Reality. State University of New York Press: Albany, N.Y. Posted on Ma J Author Andean Information Network Categories AIN Posts, Coca.

In Bolivia, one of the major coca leaf producers in the world, the control over coca leaf production lies with Quechua and Aymara indigenous peasant producers, who represent part of an Andean agrarian civilization dating back thousands of years.

The Bolivian population regularly use the coca leaf for daily sustenance and some 40 different health remedies. Books about Bolivian studies. Language: en Pages: The Bolivian Revolution and the United States, to the Present.

Authors: James F. Siekmeier. Categories: Political Science. Type: BOOK - Published: - Publisher: Penn State Press. Get Books "A study of United States-Bolivian in the post-World War II era. Explores attempts by. In the s, coca cultivation in Bolivia expanded considerably, out of the Yungas and into the Chapare region and beyond.

As a result, coca became Bolivia’s most lucrative crop, with production soon flowing into the international cocaine market. In the late s, approximately 15% of cocaine in the US originated from Bolivia. Books > Nonfiction; Share - Coca, Cocaine, and the Bolivian Reality (, Paperback) Coca, Cocaine, and the Bolivian Reality (, Paperback) Be the first to write a review.

About this product. Current slide {CURRENT_SLIDE} of {TOTAL_SLIDES}- Top picked items. Brand new. $   Coca cultivation jumped 10% in Bolivia inthe final year of President Evo Morales' government, partly because of reduced eradication efforts amid rising social and political conflicts, a U.N.

Bolivia transitioned to democracy in against a background of economic crisis. The imposition of harsh-neoliberal structural reforms would bring stability to the national economy, but at a severe social cost.

For large swathes of the population, the coca-cocaine economy provided a vital social-safety net during this period of crisis. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for COCA, COCAINE AND BOLIVIAN REALITY By Harry Sanabria - Hardcover at the best online.

Bolivia’s long and sparsely populated borders mean that the country struggles not only with its own cocaine production, but as a main transit country for coca paste and cocaine from Peru to.In Coca Yes, Cocaine No Thomas Grisaffi traces the political ascent and transformation of the Movement toward Socialism (MAS) from an agricultural union of coca growers into Bolivia's ruling party.

When Evo Morales—leader of the MAS—became Bolivia's president incoca growers celebrated his election and the possibility of scaling up their form of grassroots democracy to the national.

Inthe Bolivian government granted each registered coca growing family in the Chapare (one of Bolivia’s two main coca growing regions) the right to grow a cato ( m 2) of coca.

Policymakers and coca growers jointly agreed upon the size of the coca plot in an effort to provide each family with the equivalent of a monthly minimum wage.